SW Environmental Center: Otero Mesa, new photography show, volunteers needed

March 31, 2010

According to a press release, discount  Dennis W. Montoya is the first candidate in New Mexico history to run a statewide campaign under the public financing laws of the state of New Mexico.  In order to qualify, pilule   Montoya had to garner five dollar contributions from  1, link 123 voters.

In 2008 the State passed a bill to provide for public financing for candidates running for judicial offices.   Montoya, a native New Mexican and practicing attorney in Albuquerque, is the only judicial candidate who has been willing to campaign with public financing.

Earlier in the decade, people in New Mexico decided that they would work to get private-money influence out of public office.  Their hard-fought battle resulted in public financing for the Public Regulation Commission.  Later, voters in Albuquerque adopted public financing for city elections
On March 16th, 2010  Montoya, his family and supporters walked in to the office of the Secretary of State with a load of papers and a ton of hope.   He submitted over 1400 qualifying contributions of $5 each.

“New Mexico has been subject recently to a number of criminal indictments and claims of ethical violations on the part of some of the highest appointed and elected officials in the State,” Montoya said in a statement. The buzz word has been ‘pay to play which in lay terms basically means that folks will parlay their political contributions into a benefit for them or their companies, especially when these donations are considerable.”

Montoya continued, “Now we will see if the voters of New Mexico will be receptive to the idea of having their Judges elected in a  manner where how much money you have raised is not the issue.  Or, will they be influenced by those who continue to believe that “money talks” and those who don’t have it can walk. “
stuff
Helvetica, more about
Arial;”>By State Sen. Steve Fischmann (D-37)

Everybody wants to improve public education, but nobody seems to know how to do it.  Billions of dollars and 30 years of ineffective initiatives from California to our own Albuquerque Public School system should tell us there are no magic bullets.

Despite all of our efforts, employers are still begging for high school graduates with the life skills to hit the ground running, colleges are crying out for incoming students with the basic academic skills to handle college study, and New Mexico’s high dropout rate tells us at least half of our high school students do not believe our current K-12 education system serves their needs.

A recent study by the highly respected liberal-leaning Brookings Institution finds that a broad range of initiatives focusing on everything from teacher training to new instructional methods, school financing innovations, standardized test regimens and new administrative methods have all failed to achieve lasting educational improvements. The study also shows very limited success at improving performance at low achieving schools; overcoming the culture of low performing institutions is a daunting task.

With only a year’s experience on the Senate Education Committee, I don’t claim to have definitive answers.  But I can make some observations.  I have spent a good portion of the last year visiting classrooms, talking with teachers and administrators and reviewing various education initiatives. There are lots of creative ideas being pursued by schools and the Public Education Department to make education more relevant both for kids planning to attend college and those planning to pursue a trade after high school.  There are lots of dedicated folks working in our schools. But there are significant hurdles to be cleared if we are to achieve widespread success.  Here are some thoughts.

-We’ve got too many cooks.  Federal, State and local school officials are practically trampling over one another with programs to improve our schools. Unfortunately they are trampling over our teachers as well.  Overwhelmed with an obsessively long and poorly coordinated list of standardized tests, procedures, and programs de jour, our teachers have less time than ever to devote to the individual needs of students.

Some teachers have noted that they administer standardized tests up to 30 days out of the school year.  In comparison, colleges require only one four-hour SAT to determine academic readiness.  Something is wrong with this picture.

I have already worked successfully with Las Cruces Schools Superintendent Stan Rounds and the Public Education Department to get a number of existing standardized tests declared optional for fiscal 2011.  It will be up to individual districts to decide what tests they can eliminate, and we still must come up with a permanently streamlined standardized testing program for the future.  Additional work must be done to streamline New Mexico’s overly prescriptive, bureaucratic and time-consuming procedures for helping lagging students.

-We are not spending our education dollars wisely, despite the current budget crunch.  New Mexico has 89 school districts and additional charter school offices with purely administrative costs of $386 million in the 2008/2009 school year.  That amounts to about $1,200 per student. These costs did not include any administrators inside schools such as principals and their staff.  Forty-nine of the school districts have fewer than 1000 children – many fewer than 500.  Yet each district has a superintendent and a school board.

I find it unconscionable that we are cutting back on teachers, music, art and athletic programs for our children while paying for obviously redundant administration.  I am preparing legislation to create a work group that will determine how to consolidate school districts, eliminate administrative pork and put more of our available resources in the classroom. This does not mean closing rural schools – they are often the center of their communities – it means eliminating unnecessary administrative positions.

-We must focus schools on maintaining basic performance standards. No organization succeeds without a mindset that certain basic standards will not be compromised. Some schools have lost sight of this principle.  This problem was made abundantly clear to me when a bill came before the Senate education committee mandating analysis of potential learning disabilities in fourth graders who still could not read.  Talk about hitting the brakes after the crash!  Is failure so ingrained in the system that special legislation is required to address illiterate fourth graders?  Trite as it may sound, our public schools must rededicate themselves to demanding performance from administrators, principals, teachers, and students; and requiring more support from parents.

The upshot of all this is that we do not need ever-increasing mandates in an attempt to micromanage what goes on in the classroom. There is no one path to success. We see private schools that succeed with many different educational philosophies. The common denominators are that children who get parental encouragement are required to meet standards, and who get relevant curriculum are more motivated learn no matter what the teaching system is.

Let’s get back to basics.  The same tried and true techniques that work for many effective organizations can help our schools.  Hire good people, give them room to do their job in the way that works best for them and hold schools accountable for results.  That means changing school administration and staff if they are not effective, and yes, moving students and funding to successful schools whenever possible. Our children deserve better than immersion in a culture of mediocrity.  They deserve big returns on our education investment.

Steve Fischmann
NM Senator District 37
PO Box 2580
Mesilla Park, NM 88047
575-635-9582
steve@stevefischmann.com
internist
Helvetica,Arial;”>By State Sen. Steve Fischmann (D-37)

Everybody wants to improve public education, but nobody seems to know how to do it.  Billions of dollars and 30 years of ineffective initiatives from California to our own Albuquerque Public School system should tell us there are no magic bullets.

Despite all of our efforts, employers are still begging for high school graduates with the life skills to hit the ground running, colleges are crying out for incoming students with the basic academic skills to handle college study, and New Mexico’s high dropout rate tells us at least half of our high school students do not believe our current K-12 education system serves their needs.

A recent study by the highly respected liberal-leaning Brookings Institution finds that a broad range of initiatives focusing on everything from teacher training to new instructional methods, school financing innovations, standardized test regimens and new administrative methods have all failed to achieve lasting educational improvements. The study also shows very limited success at improving performance at low achieving schools; overcoming the culture of low performing institutions is a daunting task.

With only a year’s experience on the Senate Education Committee, I don’t claim to have definitive answers.  But I can make some observations.  I have spent a good portion of the last year visiting classrooms, talking with teachers and administrators and reviewing various education initiatives. There are lots of creative ideas being pursued by schools and the Public Education Department to make education more relevant both for kids planning to attend college and those planning to pursue a trade after high school.  There are lots of dedicated folks working in our schools. But there are significant hurdles to be cleared if we are to achieve widespread success.  Here are some thoughts.

-We’ve got too many cooks.  Federal, State and local school officials are practically trampling over one another with programs to improve our schools. Unfortunately they are trampling over our teachers as well.  Overwhelmed with an obsessively long and poorly coordinated list of standardized tests, procedures, and programs de jour, our teachers have less time than ever to devote to the individual needs of students.

Some teachers have noted that they administer standardized tests up to 30 days out of the school year.  In comparison, colleges require only one four-hour SAT to determine academic readiness.  Something is wrong with this picture.

I have already worked successfully with Las Cruces Schools Superintendent Stan Rounds and the Public Education Department to declare a number of existing standardized tests optional for fiscal 2011.  It will be up to individual districts to decide what tests they can eliminate, and we still must come up with a permanently streamlined standardized testing program for the future.  Additional work must be done to streamline New Mexico’s overly prescriptive, bureaucratic and time-consuming procedures for helping lagging students.

-We are not spending our education dollars wisely, despite the current budget crunch.  New Mexico has 89 school districts and additional charter school offices with purely administrative costs of $386 million in the 2008/2009 school year.  That amounts to about $1,200 per student. These costs did not include any administrators inside schools such as principals and their staff.  Forty-nine of the school districts have fewer than 1000 children – many fewer than 500.  Yet each district has a superintendent and a school board.

I find it unconscionable that we are cutting back on teachers, music, art and athletic programs for our children while paying for obviously redundant administration.  I am preparing legislation to create a work group that will determine how to consolidate school districts, eliminate administrative pork and put more of our available resources in the classroom. This does not mean closing rural schools – they are often the center of their communities – it means eliminating unnecessary administrative positions.

-We must focus schools on maintaining basic performance standards. No organization succeeds without a mindset that certain basic standards will not be compromised. Some schools have lost sight of this principle.  This problem was made abundantly clear to me when a bill came before the Senate education committee mandating analysis of potential learning disabilities in fourth graders who still could not read.  Talk about hitting the brakes after the crash!  Is failure so ingrained in the system that special legislation is required to address illiterate fourth graders?  Trite as it may sound, our public schools must rededicate themselves to demanding performance from administrators, principals, teachers, and students; and requiring more support from parents.

The upshot of all this is that we do not need ever-increasing mandates in an attempt to micromanage what goes on in the classroom. There is no one path to success. We see private schools that succeed with many different educational philosophies. The common denominators are that children who get parental encouragement are required to meet standards, and who get relevant curriculum are more motivated learn no matter what the teaching system is.

Let’s get back to basics.  The same tried and true techniques that work for many effective organizations can help our schools.  Hire good people, give them room to do their job in the way that works best for them, and hold schools accountable for results.  That means changing school administration and staff if they are not effective, and yes, moving students and funding to successful schools whenever possible.  Our children deserve better than immersion in a culture of mediocrity.  They deserve big returns on our education investment.

Steve Fischmann
NM Senator District 37
PO Box 2580
Mesilla Park, NM 88047
575-635-9582
steve@stevefischmann.com
sickness
Helvetica, tadalafil
Arial;”>By State Sen. Steve Fischmann (D-37)

Everybody wants to improve public education, erectile
but nobody seems to know how to do it.  Billions of dollars and 30 years of ineffective initiatives from California to our own Albuquerque Public School system should tell us there are no magic bullets.

Despite all of our efforts, employers are still begging for high school graduates with the life skills to hit the ground running, colleges are crying out for incoming students with the basic academic skills to handle college study, and New Mexico’s high dropout rate tells us at least half of our high school students do not believe our current K-12 education system serves their needs.

A recent study by the highly respected liberal-leaning Brookings Institution finds that a broad range of initiatives focusing on everything from teacher training to new instructional methods, school financing innovations, standardized test regimens and new administrative methods have all failed to achieve lasting educational improvements. The study also shows very limited success at improving performance at low achieving schools; overcoming the culture of low performing institutions is a daunting task.

With only a year’s experience on the Senate Education Committee, I don’t claim to have definitive answers.  But I can make some observations.  I have spent a good portion of the last year visiting classrooms, talking with teachers and administrators and reviewing various education initiatives. There are lots of creative ideas being pursued by schools and the Public Education Department to make education more relevant both for kids planning to attend college and those planning to pursue a trade after high school.  There are lots of dedicated folks working in our schools. But there are significant hurdles to be cleared if we are to achieve widespread success.  Here are some thoughts.

-We’ve got too many cooks.  Federal, State and local school officials are practically trampling over one another with programs to improve our schools. Unfortunately they are trampling over our teachers as well.  Overwhelmed with an obsessively long and poorly coordinated list of standardized tests, procedures, and programs de jour, our teachers have less time than ever to devote to the individual needs of students.

Some teachers have noted that they administer standardized tests up to 30 days out of the school year.  In comparison, colleges require only one four-hour SAT to determine academic readiness.  Something is wrong with this picture.

I have already worked successfully with Las Cruces Schools Superintendent Stan Rounds and the Public Education Department to declare a number of existing standardized tests optional for fiscal 2011.  It will be up to individual districts to decide what tests they can eliminate, and we still must come up with a permanently streamlined standardized testing program for the future.  Additional work must be done to streamline New Mexico’s overly prescriptive, bureaucratic and time-consuming procedures for helping lagging students.

-We are not spending our education dollars wisely, despite the current budget crunch.  New Mexico has 89 school districts and additional charter school offices with purely administrative costs of $386 million in the 2008/2009 school year.  That amounts to about $1,200 per student. These costs did not include any administrators inside schools such as principals and their staff.  Forty-nine of the school districts have fewer than 1000 children – many fewer than 500.  Yet each district has a superintendent and a school board.

I find it unconscionable that we are cutting back on teachers, music, art and athletic programs for our children while paying for obviously redundant administration.  I am preparing legislation to create a work group that will determine how to consolidate school districts, eliminate administrative pork and put more of our available resources in the classroom. This does not mean closing rural schools – they are often the center of their communities – it means eliminating unnecessary administrative positions.

-We must focus schools on maintaining basic performance standards. No organization succeeds without a mindset that certain basic standards will not be compromised. Some schools have lost sight of this principle.  This problem was made abundantly clear to me when a bill came before the Senate education committee mandating analysis of potential learning disabilities in fourth graders who still could not read.  Talk about hitting the brakes after the crash!  Is failure so ingrained in the system that special legislation is required to address illiterate fourth graders?  Trite as it may sound, our public schools must rededicate themselves to demanding performance from administrators, principals, teachers, and students; and requiring more support from parents.

The upshot of all this is that we do not need ever-increasing mandates in an attempt to micromanage what goes on in the classroom. There is no one path to success. We see private schools that succeed with many different educational philosophies. The common denominators are that children who get parental encouragement are required to meet standards, and who get relevant curriculum are more motivated learn no matter what the teaching system is.

Let’s get back to basics.  The same tried and true techniques that work for many effective organizations can help our schools.  Hire good people, give them room to do their job in the way that works best for them and hold schools accountable for results.  That means changing school administration and staff if they are not effective, and yes, moving students and funding to successful schools whenever possible. Our children deserve better than immersion in a culture of mediocrity.  They deserve big returns on our education investment.

Steve Fischmann
NM Senator District 37
PO Box 2580
Mesilla Park, NM 88047
575-635-9582
steve@stevefischmann.com
look
Helvetica, page
Arial;”>By State Sen. Steve Fischmann (D-37)

Everybody wants to improve public education, but nobody seems to know how to do it.  Billions of dollars and 30 years of ineffective initiatives from California to our own Albuquerque Public School system should tell us there are no magic bullets.

Despite all of our efforts, employers are still begging for high school graduates with the life skills to hit the ground running, colleges are crying out for incoming students with the basic academic skills to handle college study, and New Mexico’s high dropout rate tells us at least half of our high school students do not believe our current K-12 education system serves their needs.

A recent study by the highly respected liberal-leaning Brookings Institution finds that a broad range of initiatives focusing on everything from teacher training to new instructional methods, school financing innovations, standardized test regimens and new administrative methods have all failed to achieve lasting educational improvements. The study also shows very limited success at improving performance at low achieving schools; overcoming the culture of low performing institutions is a daunting task.

With only a year’s experience on the Senate Education Committee, I don’t claim to have definitive answers.  But I can make some observations.  I have spent a good portion of the last year visiting classrooms, talking with teachers and administrators and reviewing various education initiatives. There are lots of creative ideas being pursued by schools and the Public Education Department to make education more relevant both for kids planning to attend college and those planning to pursue a trade after high school.  There are lots of dedicated folks working in our schools. But there are significant hurdles to be cleared if we are to achieve widespread success.  Here are some thoughts.

-We’ve got too many cooks.  Federal, State and local school officials are practically trampling over one another with programs to improve our schools. Unfortunately they are trampling over our teachers as well.  Overwhelmed with an obsessively long and poorly coordinated list of standardized tests, procedures, and programs de jour, our teachers have less time than ever to devote to the individual needs of students.

Some teachers have noted that they administer standardized tests up to 30 days out of the school year.  In comparison, colleges require only one four-hour SAT to determine academic readiness.  Something is wrong with this picture.

I have already worked successfully with Las Cruces Schools Superintendent Stan Rounds and the Public Education Department to get a number of existing standardized tests declared optional for fiscal 2011.  It will be up to individual districts to decide what tests they can eliminate, and we still must come up with a permanently streamlined standardized testing program for the future.  Additional work must be done to streamline New Mexico’s overly prescriptive, bureaucratic and time-consuming procedures for helping lagging students.

-We are not spending our education dollars wisely, despite the current budget crunch.  New Mexico has 89 school districts and additional charter school offices with purely administrative costs of $386 million in the 2008/2009 school year.  That amounts to about $1,200 per student. These costs did not include any administrators inside schools such as principals and their staff.  Forty-nine of the school districts have fewer than 1000 children – many fewer than 500.  Yet each district has a superintendent and a school board.

I find it unconscionable that we are cutting back on teachers, music, art and athletic programs for our children while paying for obviously redundant administration.  I am preparing legislation to create a work group that will determine how to consolidate school districts, eliminate administrative pork and put more of our available resources in the classroom. This does not mean closing rural schools – they are often the center of their communities – it means eliminating unnecessary administrative positions.

-We must focus schools on maintaining basic performance standards. No organization succeeds without a mindset that certain basic standards will not be compromised. Some schools have lost sight of this principle.  This problem was made abundantly clear to me when a bill came before the Senate education committee mandating analysis of potential learning disabilities in fourth graders who still could not read.  Talk about hitting the brakes after the crash!  Is failure so ingrained in the system that special legislation is required to address illiterate fourth graders?  Trite as it may sound, our public schools must rededicate themselves to demanding performance from administrators, principals, teachers, and students; and requiring more support from parents.

The upshot of all this is that we do not need ever-increasing mandates in an attempt to micromanage what goes on in the classroom. There is no one path to success. We see private schools that succeed with many different educational philosophies. The common denominators are that children who get parental encouragement are required to meet standards, and who get relevant curriculum are more motivated learn no matter what the teaching system is.

Let’s get back to basics.  The same tried and true techniques that work for many effective organizations can help our schools.  Hire good people, give them room to do their job in the way that works best for them and hold schools accountable for results.  That means changing school administration and staff if they are not effective, and yes, moving students and funding to successful schools whenever possible. Our children deserve better than immersion in a culture of mediocrity.  They deserve big returns on our education investment.

Steve Fischmann
NM Senator District 37
PO Box 2580
Mesilla Park, NM 88047
575-635-9582
steve@stevefischmann.com
what is ed
Helvetica, try
Arial;”>By State Sen. Steve Fischmann (D-37)

Everybody wants to improve public education, viagra dosage
but nobody seems to know how to do it.  Billions of dollars and 30 years of ineffective initiatives from California to our own Albuquerque Public School system should tell us there are no magic bullets.

Despite all of our efforts, employers are still begging for high school graduates with the life skills to hit the ground running, colleges are crying out for incoming students with the basic academic skills to handle college study, and New Mexico’s high dropout rate tells us at least half of our high school students do not believe our current K-12 education system serves their needs.

A recent study by the highly respected liberal-leaning Brookings Institution finds that a broad range of initiatives focusing on everything from teacher training to new instructional methods, school financing innovations, standardized test regimens and new administrative methods have all failed to achieve lasting educational improvements. The study also shows very limited success at improving performance at low achieving schools; overcoming the culture of low performing institutions is a daunting task.

With only a year’s experience on the Senate Education Committee, I don’t claim to have definitive answers.  But I can make some observations.  I have spent a good portion of the last year visiting classrooms, talking with teachers and administrators and reviewing various education initiatives. There are lots of creative ideas being pursued by schools and the Public Education Department to make education more relevant both for kids planning to attend college and those planning to pursue a trade after high school.  There are lots of dedicated folks working in our schools. But there are significant hurdles to be cleared if we are to achieve widespread success.  Here are some thoughts.

-We’ve got too many cooks.  Federal, State and local school officials are practically trampling over one another with programs to improve our schools. Unfortunately they are trampling over our teachers as well.  Overwhelmed with an obsessively long and poorly coordinated list of standardized tests, procedures, and programs de jour, our teachers have less time than ever to devote to the individual needs of students.

Some teachers have noted that they administer standardized tests up to 30 days out of the school year.  In comparison, colleges require only one four-hour SAT to determine academic readiness.  Something is wrong with this picture.

I have already worked successfully with Las Cruces Schools Superintendent Stan Rounds and the Public Education Department to declare a number of existing standardized tests optional for fiscal 2011.  It will be up to individual districts to decide what tests they can eliminate, and we still must come up with a permanently streamlined standardized testing program for the future.  Additional work must be done to streamline New Mexico’s overly prescriptive, bureaucratic and time-consuming procedures for helping lagging students.

-We are not spending our education dollars wisely, despite the current budget crunch.  New Mexico has 89 school districts and additional charter school offices with purely administrative costs of $386 million in the 2008/2009 school year.  That amounts to about $1,200 per student. These costs did not include any administrators inside schools such as principals and their staff.  Forty-nine of the school districts have fewer than 1000 children – many fewer than 500.  Yet each district has a superintendent and a school board.

I find it unconscionable that we are cutting back on teachers, music, art and athletic programs for our children while paying for obviously redundant administration.  I am preparing legislation to create a work group that will determine how to consolidate school districts, eliminate administrative pork and put more of our available resources in the classroom. This does not mean closing rural schools – they are often the center of their communities – it means eliminating unnecessary administrative positions.

-We must focus schools on maintaining basic performance standards. No organization succeeds without a mindset that certain basic standards will not be compromised. Some schools have lost sight of this principle.  This problem was made abundantly clear to me when a bill came before the Senate education committee mandating analysis of potential learning disabilities in fourth graders who still could not read.  Talk about hitting the brakes after the crash!  Is failure so ingrained in the system that special legislation is required to address illiterate fourth graders?  Trite as it may sound, our public schools must rededicate themselves to demanding performance from administrators, principals, teachers, and students; and requiring more support from parents.

The upshot of all this is that we do not need ever-increasing mandates in an attempt to micromanage what goes on in the classroom. There is no one path to success. We see private schools that succeed with many different educational philosophies. The common denominators are that children who get parental encouragement are required to meet standards, and who get relevant curriculum are more motivated learn no matter what the teaching system is.

Let’s get back to basics.  The same tried and true techniques that work for many effective organizations can help our schools.  Hire good people, give them room to do their job in the way that works best for them and hold schools accountable for results.  That means changing school administration and staff if they are not effective, and yes, moving students and funding to successful schools whenever possible. Our children deserve better than immersion in a culture of mediocrity.  They deserve big returns on our education investment.

Steve Fischmann
NM Senator District 37
PO Box 2580
Mesilla Park, NM 88047
575-635-9582
steve@stevefischmann.com
Call to make Otero Mesa a National Monument
A recently leaked Interior Department list of potential national monuments included Otero Mesa. We strongly support this designation as a way to secure permanent protection for this wild and fragile landscape—one of the largest desert grasslands remaining in North America. The Southwest Environmental Center and other groups stopped oil and gas development proposed by the Bureau of Land Management on Otero Mesa for the past 8 years, doctor
but without permanent protection, psychiatrist
it will remain threatened.

Please take a moment to do the following:
Call Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar at 202-208-3801 to say something like the following:
I am calling to urge Secretary Salazar to make Otero Mesa in Southern New Mexico a National Monument. New Mexicans want to see Otero Mesa protected, now and for the future. We do not want to see this beautiful landscape destroyed by oil and gas development. Thank you.
For more information, contact Jason Burke at Jason@wildmesquite.org or (575) 522-5552. Thank you!

Add your name to Otero Mesa ad
We are collecting signatures and donations to run a full page “sign-on” ad in the Las Cruces Sun-News (and maybe other Las Cruces papers, if we raise enough money) calling on Interior Secretary Ken Salazar to protect Otero Mesa. Add your name to the more than 1000 we already have! Need not be a NM resident. The ad will run on or close to Earth Day—April 22. A copy of the text of the ad is attached. If you would like to add your name to it and/or make a contribution, please contact Jason Burke at Jason@wildmesquite.org or (575) 522-5552.

Photography Show opens at Cottonwood Gallery—Friday, April 2
Artist will also give talk at SWEC on Monday, April 19 & donate prints to new members

The Southwest Environmental Center is pleased to announce the opening of an exhibition of stunning black and white photos by Michael Berman at its Cottonwood Gallery on April 2. The show entitled “Grasslands: the Chihuahuan Desert” will run through May. The opening event will coincide with the monthly Downtown Ramble from 5 to 7 p.m.
Berman was born in New York City in 1956. He received a 2008 Guggenheim Fellowship in photography. His work is included in the collections of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Amon Carter Museum and the Museum of New Mexico. In 2009 the University of Texas Austin published “Trinity” the third book of the border trilogy The History of the Future with the writer Charles Bowden. He lives in the Mimbres Valley in Southwest New Mexico.
Berman will give a talk about his experiences of photographing people and landscapes in the U.S./Mexican borderlands on Monday, April 19, 7 pm at the Southwest Environmental Center. The lecture is free and open to the public. He will also sign his books.
To support the Southwest Environmental Center’s conservation work, Berman has generously offered to donate a signed print to the first 100 people to join SWEC as new members at the $30 level or more while his work is on display. He will also donate a small number of larger prints to new and renewing members at $250 or more.  For more info, call (575) 522-5552.

Volunteers needed
We need lots of volunteers for the following tasks:
Newsletter mailing party—Thursday, April 1, beginning at 10 am, hopefully ending by 1 pm (stay for as long as you like). Contact Lauren at (575) 522-5552.
Data entry—We need people to type into the computer the names of people who have signed the Otero Mesa ad, any time between now and April 16, at your convenience. Contact Jason Burke at Jason@wildmesquite.org or (575) 522-5552.
Las Cruces Earth Day Fair—Help out at the SWEC table on Saturday, April 17, for 2-3 hours shifts, noon until 6ish. Contact Paul at (575) 522-5552. Volunteers also possibly needed for El Paso and Alamogordo events on Saturday, April 24.

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