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NATION SHOCKED BY BIRTHER INVESTIGATION RESULTS

 

 

Donald Trump’s birther team, looking into Ted Cruz’s origins, announced a shocking discovery late Monday.

 

Citing exclusive access to Top-Secret files found on Hillary Clinton’s personal email server, the team claims it found proof that Cruz was not born in Canada after all, and he has been lying about his age and parentage.

 

A somber Trump described the truth as “far worse” than he imagined. “I wish he had just been born in Canada,” Trump sighed. “I could live with that.”

“Rafael Edward Cruz is a cover story,” he told a packed news conference in Manchester, N.H., on the even of primary voting. “It’s a made-up name, as is the year of his birth—not even close.”

 

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Handing out grisly color photographs, he continued, “Cruz was actually born May 2, 1957, the same day Joseph McCarthy died. That is because he sprang fully formed from the chest of Joe McCarthy who, I guess you might say, was his father and died in childbirth.”

 

Although McCarthy’s official cause of death was listed as cancer, Trump added, his investigators learned from the files that the FBI changed the death certificate because President Eisenhower and FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover felt the American people were not prepared to learn the truth about McCarthy and his offspring. Also suppressed was a file detailing McCarthy’s claims of an alien abduction about nine months before he died, but attributed by authorities to his delirium tremens.

 

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When confronted with Trump’s accusation and photos, Cruz had no comment, though he turned pale as he unsuccessfully attempted to smile.

 

Clinton said, “It wasn’t marked Top Secret when I read it.”

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Commentary

Presidential Politics and the American Soul

 

By Robert C. Koehler

When I want to believe that America is a democracy — indeed, to feel so deeply this is so that my soul trembles — I turn to Martin Luther King, who gave his life for it.

He cried out for something so much more than a process: a game of winners and losers. He reached for humanity’s deepest yearning, for the connectedness of all people, for transcendence past hatred and the demonization of “the other.” He spoke — half a century ago — the words that those in power couldn’t bear to hear because his truths cut too deep and disrupted too much business as usual.

But what else is a democracy than that?

“Now, it should be incandescently clear that no one who has any concern for the integrity and life of America today can ignore the present war . . .”

Uh oh. This ain’t politics as usual. This is King standing in the oval office, staring directly into the eyes of LBJ, declaring that civil rights legislation isn’t a political favor but merely the beginning of a nation’s moral atonement.

“If America’s soul becomes totally poisoned, part of the autopsy must read Vietnam.”

These words were part of the stunning address King delivered — on April 4, 1967, a year to the day before his assassination — at Riverside Church in New York City. To read these words today, in the context of the 2016 presidential race and the mainstream media’s inevitable focus on stats and trivia rather than big issues, is to realize how utterly relevant this man and the movement he helped awaken remain today. To read King’s words in 2016 is to rip this man out of a sentimentalized sainthood and to bring him back to living relevance.

What he had to say to the political leaders of the time must not be reduced to a few phrases carved in granite; they must be heard anew, in all their disturbing fullness. I say this not because his “day” recently passed and I’m somewhat tardily “remembering” him, but because the 2016 presidential race needs King’s presence — his uncompromised wisdom — standing tough against the media and political status quo that is now trying desperately to mute the unapproved voices spurting forth in this campaign and pulling the electorate’s attention away from the approved, mainstream candidates they’re supposed to choose between.

Paul Krugman, for instance, representing the liberal wing of the status quo, came out for compromise and Hillary the other day, dismissing Bernie Sanders not out of a specific disagreement with any of his positions but because of a contempt for the “contingent of idealistic voters eager to believe that a sufficiently high-minded leader can conjure up the better angels of America’s nature and persuade the broad public to support a radical overhaul of our institutions.”

This is how to make sure that a self-proclaimed democracy is really a faux-democracy, flawed, perhaps, but plodding along in the right direction and basically healthy, with its biggest threat not unrestrained militarism or unregulated corporate capitalism but . . . oh, universal health care. See, that’s radical.

I have yet to hear the status-quo media call the poisoning of the Flint, Mich., water supply, or the daily police shootings of young men or women of color — or the multi-trillion-dollar failure known as the war on terror — “radical,” but a candidate who wants to give a serious push for policies of social betterment (and calls himself a democratic socialist) is radical. He’s purveying false hope, disrespecting the sacred act of political compromise and dangerously trying to establish, or re-establish, the precedent that the public should get what it needs, even if those needs override the quietly laid plans of the nation’s military-industrial consensus.

Indeed, that consensus is never asked to compromise or, good God, subjected to public scrutiny — except, of course, by radicals.

This brings me back to King’s Riverside Church speech, which had the audacity to be visionary, to challenge the United States at its deepest levels of being — which is something that ought to happen during a presidential race. King looked directly at the hell we were inflicting on Vietnam and called not simply for an end to that war but an examination of the national soul.

“This,” he said, “I believe to be the privilege and the burden of all of us who deem ourselves bound by allegiances and loyalties which are broader and deeper than nationalism and which go beyond our nation’s self-defined goals and positions. We are called to speak for the weak, for the voiceless, for victims of our nation and for those it calls enemy, for no document from human hands can make these humans any less our brothers.”

The war King was crying out against ended eight years after that 1967 speech, but the poison did not disappear from the country’s soul. There was no atonement, no real change, only, ultimately, a retrenching and regrouping of the military-industrial consensus. Thus, King’s words remain as urgent and prescient today as when he first uttered them.

“The world now demands a maturity of America that we may not be able to achieve. It demands that we admit that we have been wrong from the beginning of our adventure in Vietnam, that we have been detrimental to the life of the Vietnamese people. The situation is one in which we must be ready to turn sharply from our present ways. . .

“True compassion is more than flinging a coin to a beggar; it is not haphazard and superficial. It comes to see that an edifice which produces beggars needs restructuring. A true revolution of values will soon look uneasily on the glaring contrast of poverty and wealth.”

Would that Bernie Sanders spoke with such radicalism — or drew such a clear connection between social deprivation and militarism.

Beyond that, however, I must ask, in light of the words of Martin Luther King, what kind of democracy is too terrified, and too cowardly, to examine its own soul and reach toward values that are bigger than its short-term interests? And why do we not have a media rooted in these values and committed to holding politicians accountable to them?

Robert Koehler, syndicated by PeaceVoice, is an award-winning Chicago journalist and editor.

 

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Local

Maggie Toulouse Oliver Kicks Off Campaign in Doña Ana County

TIME CHANGE: Democratic candidate for Secretary of State, Maggie Toulouse Oliver, will be hosting a meet-and-greet with Doña Ana County voters on Sunday, January 24, at 4:00 p.m. in Las Cruces.

Toulouse Oliver will talk with community members and the media at the home of Liz Rodriguez-Johnson located at 5600 Remington Rd., Las Cruces, NM, 88011.

Toulouse Oliver, currently the Bernalillo County Clerk, is campaigning for a more transparent and accountable state government that New Mexicans can trust.

WHAT: Meet and greet with Maggie Toulouse Oliver

WHEN: 4:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. on Sunday, January 24

WHERE: 5600 Remington Rd., Las Cruces, NM, 88011

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Border

Environment

SWEC: Progress on wetland project

A wetland grows in the desert

Our contractors on the Southwest Environmental Center’s La Mancha Wetland project have been busy. They’ve moved massive amounts of dirt over the past 10 days, and the results are truly amazing. What had been a mostly dry basin is being transformed before our eyes into a series of groundwater-fed ponds connected by meandering channels, reminiscent of the historic Rio Grande floodplain. It is easy to envision the lush green oasis it will soon become. Click here to check our progress.

Want to help?

Once the dirt work is finished next week, we will need an army of volunteers to help with things like planting native plants, removing invasive salt cedar, burning tumbleweeds, installing bat houses, etc. If you’ve liked to volunteer, let kali@wildmesquite.org know. Our first volunteer weekend is tentatively scheduled for the first weekend in March, with a campout option at the site. Stay tuned for details!

Adopt a Tree (or bat house, etc.)

Restoring wetlands is not cheap. We still need to raise more money to complete this project. You can help by adopting a cottonwood, native plants, bat house, or trail camera. With your help, we will soon provide native fish, turtles, frogs, and countless birds with a year-round home and take another step towards restoring the Rio Grande to health.

Protecting jaguars in the U.S./Mexico Borderlands

Renowned for their power, beauty, and grace, jaguars once roamed across much of the southern United States. Today, these predators are vanishing throughout the Americas. Join us for a Tuesday Talk at SWEC on February 9th at 7 pm by Diana Hadley, president of the Northern Jaguar Project. She’ll tell us about the groundbreaking work the project is doing to protect jaguars and build tolerance among ranchers in northern Mexico. Free and open to the public.

Internships available

SWEC has a number of internships currently available, including an ecological restoration intern(s) to help with our La Mancha wetland project.  Click here to see what’s available and how to apply.

Back by Noons are coming

We are putting the finishing touches on our schedule of Spring 2016 Back by Noon guided Saturday morning natural history outings. Expect the first outing in February. Stay tuned for details. In the meantime, check out the new edition of SWEC’s hiking guide.

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    Commentary

    Presidential Politics and the American Soul

      By Robert C. Koehler When I want to believe that America is a democracy — indeed, to feel so deeply this is so that my soul trembles — I turn to Martin... Read more »

    February 9, 2016 | Leave a Comment


    News

    Child Advocates Caution against Reinstating Food Tax

        ALBUQUERQUE—Dr. Veronica C. García, Ed.D., executive director of New Mexico Voices for Children, issued the following statement regarding legislation... Read more »

    February 4, 2016 | Leave a Comment


    Local/Area

    Maggie Toulouse Oliver Kicks Off Campaign in Doña Ana County

    TIME CHANGE: Democratic candidate for Secretary of State, Maggie Toulouse Oliver, will be hosting a meet-and-greet with Doña Ana County voters on Sunday, January... Read more »

    January 23, 2016 | Leave a Comment


    Upcoming

    NMSU Cooperative Extension Service, NM Department of Health host cooking school for adults with diabetes

    Adults in New Mexico who have been diagnosed with diabetes can learn how to prepare healthy and delicious meals by participating in the Kitchen Creations cooking... Read more »

    January 19, 2016 | Leave a Comment


    Letters

    Tell NM to stop Payday and Title Loan Rip Offs

    Four in 10 New Mexico title loan borrowers lost their cars in 2014.  That’s 10,000 autos repossessed.   Payday and title loan borrowers paid interest... Read more »

    February 4, 2016 | Leave a Comment


    Reviews

    War Speaks Every Language But Never Knows What to Say to Frogs

      By David Swanson Review: Why War Is Never a Good Idea, Alice Walker (2007). HarperCollins.   Alice Walker explains this line, “Though war speaks... Read more »

    July 3, 2015 | Leave a Comment


    Sustainable Living

    La Semilla: Fall at the Farm

    Raices de Tradición Youth Program Our third and final session of 2015 wrapped up this past Saturday with youth leading a Healthy Holiday Cooking Workshop.  Raices... Read more »

    November 25, 2015 | Leave a Comment


    Environment

    SWEC: Progress on wetland project

    A wetland grows in the desert Our contractors on the Southwest Environmental Center’s La Mancha Wetland project have been busy. They’ve moved massive amounts... Read more »

    January 28, 2016 | Leave a Comment


    Arts

    University Art Gallery at NMSU to host environmentally focused show, discussion panel

    The New Mexico State University Art Gallery will host the opening reception for “Water! What is it good for?” from 5-7 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 21. This exhibition... Read more »

    January 14, 2016 | Leave a Comment


    Border

    Juárez Women’s Mural Vandalized

    Parents of missing young women in Ciudad Juarez are expressing outrage over the desecration of a mural dedicated to their daughters. Located in the heart of the... Read more »

    February 1, 2016 | Leave a Comment


    Spiritual

    Pax Christi Film Series Presents ‘The Black Power Mixtape’

    The Black Panther Party has often been portrayed as a bunch of gun-toting militants, but the Pax Christi film for Black History Month tells a story that’s... Read more »

    February 1, 2016 | Leave a Comment


    Events Calendar

    Albuquerque Center for Peace & Justice Plans March & Rally

    Sunday, February 21, at 2pm Gather at Albuquerque’s Civic Plaza for a March and Rally Against Hate/Stand Up to Trump & All Bigotry For more info, go to... Read more »

    February 8, 2016 | Leave a Comment


    Links

  • The Light of New Mexico
  • Green Fire Times
  • Transition Times--Colorado
  • Heath Haussamen: NM Politics
  • Thomas Wark
  • Carolyn Baker: “Speaking truth to power”
  • James Howard Kunstler: The Clusterfuck Nation Chronicle
  • Dada's Dally: defies description
  • Desert Journal: NM online newspaper
  • Bruce Gagnon: Organizing Notes
  • Sally Erickson: The end of empire
  • Steve Klinger’s music and blogs: Songs for change; music blog
  • Progressive Democratic activist site
  • Gordon Solberg
  • Brenda Norrell: Censored and under-reported news
  • Rio Grande Digital: Las Cruce/El Paso/Juarez news and culture
  • JourneySantaFe—Water: Who Controls It?

  • Social Widgets powered by AB-WebLog.com.