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Weekly RESISTance Calendar

November is Native American Heritage Month.

 

 

 

Sunday, November 19, 2017

     Consumers of News Need to Get More Demanding Again is the topic of the Roundtable discussion at the Unitarian Universalist Church, 2000 S Solano, from 10:30-11:30am.  Walter Rubel, editorial page editor of the Las Cruces Sun-News will be the discussion leader.  Traditional news outlets have some form of oversight by industry standards and FCC to present fair and accurate information. Facebook and Twitter have none, as was evident in the 2016 election. We need to move beyond that history and develop some new norms for these new social media outlets—as they affect the integrity of our democracy.

 

 

Monday, November 20, 2017

     Las Cruces City Council Meeting where the Minimum Wage issue is on the agenda.  This will be the first discussion in a regular session and the final vote will be done at the Dec. 4 meeting.  Meeting begins at 4:00pm in the Council chambers of City Hall.

 

Planned Parenthood Votes town hall a year after the election.  Celebrate victories and prepare for the fight ahead.  Starting at 6:00pm, the Las Cruces location will be announced after you RSVP to http://bit.ly/PP2017TownHall.

 

LOOKING AHEAD:

 

Monday, November 27, 2017

Public Meeting on Colonia Reform to be held from 6:00-8:00pm at the Hatch Community Center, 837 W Hall St.  The purpose of the meeting is to educate the public on how to help improve conditions within Dona Ana County’s colonias.  Commissioners Isabella Solis and Ramon Gonzalez will attend.

 

 

 

Thursday, November 30, 2017

     PFLAG Annual Fundraiser at Hotel Encanto beginning at 6:00pm.  Celebrating 22 years in Las Cruces supporting, educating, and advocating for the LGBTQ+ community, the evening will include dinner (choice of Chicken Asadero, Beef Sirloin Tips, or Polenta Lasagna), performance by Singing Out, unveiling of “Telling Our Stories” video of local people sharing personal and family stories, awards, and silent and live auctions.  Tickets at $35 each are available for purchase at SpiritWinds, Lulu’s of Mesilla, and by calling Ryan Steinmetz at 635-9455.

 

 

Tune in to 101.5FM every day to hear KTAL-LP, our new, low-powered community radio.  Democracy Now can be heard and an eclectic mix of music plays between programs.  Hosts include Shannon Reynolds, Steve Fischmann, Peter Goodman, Lynn Moorer and Susan Fitzgerald.  Your tax-deductible contributions for equipment and syndicated shows such as Democracy Now are welcome.  Check out their web site at www.RadioQuetal.org and hit the donate button.

 

resistlc@googlegroups.com

Commentary

Empowering the vulnerable

 

By Robert C. Koehler

 

OK, here’s a good one: What’s the position of women in the antiwar movement?

This was circa 1967, when I was a college kid just coming of age, psychologically and politically. I was a hippie. I had stopped cutting my hair. I’d discovered pot. And I was outraged by the Vietnam War. I was also still swaddled in the sexism of the day, and I laughed knowingly at the answer to this little joke:

Prone.

By the early ’70s, women’s rights emerged as a movement and a lot of men began to see that sort of humor in a stunningly different context. I went through a year of shame and shock as I became aware of my own sexism — “you gotta control your woman” — and did my best to embrace feminism and surrender the stupid male birthright that this was my world more than it was hers . . . that I was the boss, that sex was something to be pried loose from her.

Forty years later, I find myself coming to grips with the fact that women’s rights have been only partially implemented and the social change they have wrought remains superficial. Women have more employment and career opportunities now, but still in the context of institutions conceived and built by men. In that sense, it’s still a patriarchy, a “man’s world” — a world at war with itself both internally and externally.

But maybe this is what has begun to change. The #metoo movement — the massive outing of sexual harassers on social and other media — is accomplishing something far more valuable than the tarnishing of the reputations of powerful and important men. It’s empowering the vulnerable. And this is what matters.

“. . . then he came at me, put his hand on the back of my head, mashed his lips against mine and aggressively stuck his tongue in my mouth.

“I immediately pushed him away with both of my hands against his chest and told him if he ever did that to me again I wouldn’t be so nice about it the next time.

“I walked away. All I could think about was getting to a bathroom as fast as possible to rinse the taste of him out of my mouth.

“I felt disgusted and violated.”

Two things strike me as profoundly significant about Leeann Tweeden’s accusation that Sen. Al Franken kissed and fondled her without permission in 2006, when both were part of a USO tour to the Middle East to entertain U.S. troops. One is that Tweeden found the will and courage to make the incident public, something she couldn’t do at the time. “I was worried about the potential backlash and damage going public might have on my career as a broadcaster,” she wrote at KABC.com, where she is a news anchor.

“But that was then, this is now. I’m no longer afraid.”

What gave her the will to come forward, she said, was that California Congresswoman Jackie Speier, in a recent interview on the station, talked about being sexually assaulted when she was a young congressional aide, describing an incident very similar to what had happened to Tweeden.

And 11 years later, the emotional impact of it was still intense. She had not let go of it. She realized the time had come to go public about it.

And this is how a movement of empowerment grows from the roots. As women — as men — come forward and reveal these painful secrets, often shrouded in shame, their courage resonates with others who are haunted by similar incidents, who suddenly no longer feel isolated in their embarrassment and anger.

The second significant aspect, to me, is Franken’s response. Rather than pushing back against his accuser and attempting to protect his position of power at all costs, he apologized publicly, not as a means of ending the matter and moving on but with full realization that, in foolishly violating his own values, he had contributed to a social wrong that he is now obligated to help undo.

“Coming from the world of comedy,” he wrote, “I’ve told and written a lot of jokes that I once thought were funny but later came to realize were just plain offensive. But the intentions behind my actions aren’t the point at all. It’s the impact these jokes had on others that matters. And I’m sorry it’s taken me so long to come to terms with that.

“While I don’t remember the rehearsal for the skit as Leeann does, I understand why we need to listen to and believe women’s experiences.

“I am asking that an ethics investigation be undertaken, and I will gladly cooperate.

“And the truth is, what people think of me in light of this is far less important than what people think of women who continue to come forward to tell their stories. They deserve to be heard, and believed. And they deserve to know that I am their ally and supporter. I have let them down and am committed to making it up to them.”

Punishing the wrongdoer — wrapping him in eternal shame — is beside the point, even though it’s as far as the institutions of “man’s world” are able to see. What truly matters is healing the wounds and transforming the culture of smirking male domination over women.

This work involves everyone, including, especially, the person who has acknowledged the harm he has caused. In so doing, he has made himself vulnerable. This is the beginning of empowerment.

 

Robert Koehler, syndicated by PeaceVoice, is a Chicago award-winning journalist and editor.

Local

PVA Meeting Recap

Here is a link to the recap of the October PVA meeting:

http://pva-nm.org/category/meeting-recap/

Also, please check out our calendar of events – find something you’re interested in and import it directly into your calendar! Link to the calendar here.

Due to the holidays, PVA doesn’t meet in November or December. Mark your calendars, our next meeting will be on:
          Thursday, January 25, 7:00pm
Munson Senior Center

 

Border

Environment

SWEC: Your tax dollars at work?

Ending a secretive federal wildlife killing program in NM

Did you know that most counties in New Mexico, including Doña Ana, use tax dollars to support a secretive federal wildlife killing program? Join us for a presentation by Michelle Lute of WildEarth Guardians on Tuesday, 11/14, 7 pm at SWEC. She’ll talk about how this rogue program works and what you can do to help end it in New Mexico. Last year in New Mexico alone, the ironically-named Wildlife Services killed over 3,400 coyotes, 30 bobcats, and admitted accidentally killing nine domestic dogs and 57 foxes, including 10 imperiled swift foxes. With little accountability, Dona Ana County contributes more than $30,000 of tax dollars annually to this program. The talk is free and open to the public. For more info, contact kevin@wildmesquite.org.

Tell Congress: No boots, no beds, no border wall!

Between now and the end of the year, there will be tremendous pressure on Congress to provide funding for the administration’s border militarization agenda, including more border patrol and ICE agents, more detention facilities (run by private prison companies), and construction of the border wall, which would have a devastating impact on wildlife and habitats. In New Mexico, we are gathering petition signatures to deliver to Senators Heinrich and Udall to demonstrate the extent of public opposition to this agenda. Please add your voice by signing our border wall petition today!  If you live outside New Mexico, you can still sign—we’ll make sure your senators receive them.

Trek to Aztec Cave in the Franklin Mountains

It’s pretty certain the Aztecs never made it to the Franklin Mountains of El Paso, but there is an Aztec Cave and we’ll be going to it on this strenuous Back by Noon outing on Saturday, 12/2 led by a Franklin Mountains State Park ranger. Besides the cave, we’ll be rewarded with some impressive views of the surrounding area on this last BBN outing of the year. Contact Ashley@wildmesquite.org to register.

 

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    Empowering the vulnerable

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    Upcoming

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    Environment

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    Arts

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    Border

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    Spiritual

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    Events Calendar

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    Links

  • The Light of New Mexico
  • Green Fire Times
  • Transition Times--Colorado
  • Heath Haussamen: NM Politics
  • Thomas Wark
  • Carolyn Baker: “Speaking truth to power”
  • James Howard Kunstler: The Clusterfuck Nation Chronicle
  • Dada's Dally: defies description
  • Desert Journal: NM online newspaper
  • Bruce Gagnon: Organizing Notes
  • Sally Erickson: The end of empire
  • Steve Klinger’s music and blogs: Songs for change; music blog
  • Progressive Democratic activist site
  • Gordon Solberg
  • Brenda Norrell: Censored and under-reported news
  • Rio Grande Digital: Las Cruce/El Paso/Juarez news and culture
  • JourneySantaFe—Water: Who Controls It?

  • Social Widgets powered by AB-WebLog.com.